TESTOSTERONE, MUSCLE + AGING – THE TRUTH! (Are Jason Blaha + Others WRONG?!)

So — this video comes at you as part follow-up to my previous video titled “Castration By Steroids”, which I’ve linked below for you to check out, and partly in response to folks like Jason Blaha, who have claimed that your natural testosterone levels will decline with age.

So… are guys like Jason right? Let’s look at recent research to try and reach an accurate conclusion!

A paper was released in 2014, which analyzed the data from 16 studies, of over 10,000 healthy men aged 3 through 101. They excluded any studies, for instance, that involved the ill, or men on testosterone replacement drugs.

This research was very well-controlled, and it was pretty fucking big! Let’s be honest here.

They found that in healthy men, testosterone is low before puberty. That it rises by age 11, and peaks by age 19. Testosterone will decrease by about 15% between 19 and 40, but there is NO evidence of progressive decline there on out!

You heard that correctly… in healthy men over 40, testosterone DOES NOT appear to decline any further. In fact, in a large portion of men 40 and over had clinically high-testosterone!

This actually came as a shock to me, as well. And has drastically changed my previous views on aging and hormone health, to perfectly honest.

So, we’re all learning something here: me included!

So, where does this myth of age-declining testosterone come from then?

Based on large-scale, 5 year research published in 2012, which analyzed 1,382 men aged 35-80 who do not suffer medical complications or take any medications… it appears to be poor life-style choices and subsequent body changes.

The researchers elaborated with examples like smoking, obesity, never marrying, and depression.

Yes, you heard that right: never marrying!

Unmarried men had significantly lower testosterone than married men, as married men trended toward being happier, healthier, and enjoyed regular “sexy time” with their wives – which has a documented positive effect on testosterone.

So… if you’re a guy who drinks, smokes, takes drugs, and/or is terminally-single… you should work on those things for a healthier and happier aging experience.

I can already sense the “Men Go Their Own Way” types cringing.

But, hey, science doesn’t agree with you. I’m just the messenger.

So… what do you do if you have already fucked yourself up with over-indulgence and being excessively sedentary?

Hint… this is the wrong answer. On so many levels!

First of all, aside from obviously dropping your bad habits and addictions, exercise fucking helps… a lot!

There exists a 2015 study from Japan on 44 fat men in their 50s.

When these men paid attention to proper diet and exercise for just 12 weeks, their testosterone levels rose by over 9%!

Granted, these men only engaged in brisk walking and jogging a few times per week, so that leads me to wonder: would we have seen a higher increase in testosterone had that pumped some iron?

Well… science? What say you?

As it turns out, strength-training just 3 times per week, over an extended period of time, increases your natural anabolic hormone levels, and decreases your catabolic stress hormones.

In fact, the “big T” increases by about 40%! Just from picking some heavy shit up, and putting that shit back down… a lot.

But, that brings us to the next part of this video: what about muscle as we age?!

Fear not, science has got you covered with that one too.

There’s a study from 2009, on 600 men and women, rather evenly divided up by gender, and into age groups from 18 to 39.

Over the course of 12 weeks, these men and women engaged in a weight training program 2 times per week, that progressively increased in weight and intensity.

By the end of the 12 weeks, muscles of ALL participants became larger, without any noticable difference in gains.

The only differences experienced were that:

The 18-19 year olds improved their 1 rep max by ~20% more than 20-29 year olds.

And 20-29 year olds improved their 1RM by ~8% more than 30-39 year olds.

But, I repeat… muscle growth was the same across all age groups!

These results suggest that you shouldn’t be discouraged from beginning weight training later in life.

Your better years for muscle-building are NOT necessarily behind you, barring any health complications.

But… what about those differences in strength gains?

Yet another study, from a year later, which comparing 19 men aged 60-82 with 16 men aged 16-24, found that while younger muscles are stronger, they have less training endurance over the course of exercise sets than healthy, older muscles do.

The researchers suspect that older muscles acquire their energy in a different way than younger muscles do.

And that wraps things up!

The key takeaways are:

Live a healthy life through both diet and exercise — specifically weight training!

Refrain from smoking, drinking and using drugs.

Find a loving companion, and enjoy a healthy sex life.

And, barring any health complications that are out of your control, worry not about the effects of age on your hormones or muscle mass!

REFERENCES

My video “CASTRATION By Steroids! The Ugly Truth!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RX3ZRcVzQs

A Validated Age-Related Normative Model for Male Total Testosterone Shows Increasing Variance but No Decline after Age 40 Years https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190174/

Testosterone Does Not Necessarily Wane With Age http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247013.php

Lifestyle modification increases serum testosterone level and decrease central blood pressure in overweight and obese men. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25753766

Variations in urine excretion of steroid hormones after an acute session and after a 4-week programme of strength training http://www.springerlink.com/content/w46g00622r2j3k31/

Association of age with muscle size and strength before and after short-term resistance training in young adults. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19749605

Enhanced fatigue resistance in older adults during repeated sets of intermittent contractions. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661832

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