Talking to Retards: Episode 1 – “Food Doesn’t Build Muscle”

So, I’ve decided to launch an informative and quite offensive new series called “Talking to Retards”, which YouTube will likely demonetized right from the starting gates for, at the very least, being “yugely” un-PC.

But, hey, I’m sorta used to being demonetized…

Each installment of this series will feature something astoundingly-dumb that someone has proclaimed under one of my videos.

Something so incredibly-dense that you may actually suffer a brain aneurysm by simply reading or hearing it; you have been warned!

And I will follow said stupid with my thoughtful insight and commentary on the topic, supported by research wherever possible.

Now, given the plethora of dumb shit that people have excreted under my videos over the years, I no doubt will have an endless stream of content at my disposal for both your amusement and education… but, hopefully, mostly for your amusement.

To kick this series off, one particularly dopey specimen took this epic dump under my recent Vegan Gains response video: “Cory McCarthy believes in the high fat ketogenic diet. So can you really trust anything he has to say about how to eat? Intermittent fasting is just a starvation diet. You can starve yourself by eating small meals throughout the day too. Keto people like it because they eat high fat, high calorie so they have to limit their meals. Muscle growth occurs from lifting weights not from food so don’t expect any miracle gains from fasting.”

Literally, everything about this comment is just wrong… wrong to same magnitude as this… whatever the fuck THIS is!

A lot of what this guy wrote just straw-manned and/or over-generalizes the fuck out of my position on particular subjects, such as the ketogenic diet.

And, worse yet, he uses said misrepresentation to suggests that no one should trust my nutrition advice.

But the part of his comment that features a particularly hard-to-beat, award-winning level of dumb is his proclamation that muscle growth occurs from lifting weights, not from food.

Take a moment to digest that before I continue…

A meta-analysis has confirmed that the fewer calories that we eat, the more weight we’ll lose. Furthermore, the greater the caloric-deficit the greater the potential LOSS. OF. MUSCLE., not just fat tissue.

Conversely, another meta-analysis has confirmed that the more calories that we consume, the more weight we’ll gain. Furthermore, the greater the caloric-surplus the greater the amount of fat we’ll gain compared to muscle.

So, it appears that the calories we consume affect our body weight, and yes, that includes muscle mass.

Well, fuck me! Who’d have thought?!

But, the plot thickens!

Now, you may find this hard-to-believe… but it turns out that the TYPES of foods we eat, of which those calories are comprised… also matters!

I mean, holy-living-fuck! This is literally some game-changing shit here, folks!

Yet another meta-analysis has confirmed that protein intake significantly-enhances muscle strength and size in resistance-trained adults. And, wow! We’re even told how much protein is recommended to optimize our results!

What’s more, it appears that dietary fat plays a crucial role in our endogenous sex hormones levels, like testosterone. For instance, low-fat diets appear to reduce testosterone levels in men!

And, what would you know… testosterone appears to play a role in muscle growth!

So… fat must play a hand in muscle growth too!

Really interesting shit here, guys. I mean, “grade A”!

Anyway… I think I’m just going to stop at this point, as I just feel ridiculous having actually cited research papers demonstrating the importance of FOOD when it comes to muscle growth. Even if my core intention was to be a dick.

In all seriousness, it doesn’t require a degree in nutritional science to reach the conclusion that, if you lift weights and don’t eat enough or properly, that you’ll be throwing a wrench in the gears of your results.

Lifting is only one-third of the basic equation for size and strength, which also includes proper rest and… gasp!… FOOD!

Anyhow, do leave your thoughts and comments below, and give this video a like and a share if you enjoyed it and want to see future installments in this series.

Sometimes it is nice to put the academia to the side for a moment, and provide a bit of entertainment. Life’s too short!

Don’t forget to subscribe to this channel, press the “bell” button for notifications, and to check back here weekly. As all three avenues will help ensure that you don’t miss any new content from me.

Also, check out the video description for links to my products and services, as well as affiliate links, and other ways you can show your support to me and my channel if you genuinely enjoy and get use from what I provide here.

And your support is especially appreciated considering that this channel is mostly demonetized, and I do put time and effort into the content that I provide.

And definitely check out my new physique survey tool, which can help put you on the RIGHT path for YOUR individual physique and performance goals!

And help you achieve results like those seen with my clients here.

That tool is linked below, in the description.

With that, I want to thank you all for your support, thank you for watching, and I’ll see you all in the next video!

REFERENCES

Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4033492/

The Effects of Overfeeding on Body Composition: The Role of Macronutrient Composition – A Narrative Review https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5786199/

A systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression of the effect of protein supplementation on resistance training-induced gains in muscle mass and strength in healthy adults https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/6/376

Effects of dietary fat and fiber on plasma and urine androgens and estrogens in men: a controlled feeding study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8942407

Effect of testosterone on muscle mass and muscle protein synthesis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2917954

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